Tag Archives: Ras Al Khaimah

Ras Al Khaimah Fine Arts Festival at Jazeera Al Hamra

If you haven’t been already, take a trip up to Jazeera Al Hamra to see the RAK Fine Arts Festival in the fort and old village. What a great setting for an art exhibition! Enjoy seeing the restored fort and adjacent buildings as well as the unrestored houses at the same time.

The exhibition is open from 8-6 weekdays and to 10pm weekends when artwork is projected on to the fort also. On Fridays there are art productions and on Friday 13th there will be a StarWars themed event.

Other activities as part of the festival include film screenings, art workshops and tours.

For more information, visit https://www.rakfinearts.ae

For more on the old village of Jazeera al Hamra, see here.

Rams

Rams lies to the north of the city of Ras al Khaimah and relied on fishing and pearling in the past. You can still see many fishing boats going out today and Al Suwaidi Pearl Farm is flourishing.

Head over to the newly developed corniche for views of the harbour, drive around the town and look out for old buildings and watchtowers, visit the Museum of Beautiful Time and take a walk along the mangroves and look out for the myriad species of birds around, especially during the migratory season.

On the opposite side of the town, the early 19th century Dhayah Fort perches upon a hilltop giving a fabulous view across the whole town. In 1819 the fort was the last point of resistance when the village was attacked by the British in 1819. Despite the strong resistance, nearly 800 villagers were taken.

Behind the fort lie the Hajar Mountains with their mesmerising rock formations and the sandy plains below.

Don’t miss the relaxing and scenic boat trip around the coast and the visit to Al Suwaidi Pearl Farm where you’ll be surprised just how much there is to know about pearl farming. (Advance booking required) A few sneak preview photos below but click here to see and find out more.

I thought we would spend a couple of hours here, but you can quite easily spend a whole day. In fact, I need to go back to see more! Have fun exploring!

How to get there – take either the E611 and follow signs for Ras al Khaimah, then look out for the turn off to Al Rams and Oman shortly before RAK.

If you have time left over, Wadi Ghalila is just a few minutes further up the coast.

Al Suwaidi Pearl Farm

Al Suwaidi Pearl Farm is the only one of its kind in the Middle East and was set up 15 years ago by Abdulla al Suwaidi, grandson of one of the last pearl divers, Mohammed bin Abdulla Al Suwaidi.

Archeological evidence of pearls being used in the area go as far back as 6000 BC. In fact, the oldest known pearl in the world was found on an island in Abu Dhabi and is around 8000 years old and is now on display in Le Louvre in the capital.

Pearls have not only been found near the coast. A pearl necklace estimated to be around 7000 years old was found in a Palaeolithic period grave at Al Buhais in Al Madam Desert. Pearls may have been traded for pottery at that time.

The Tour

The tour leaves from the harbour in a traditional boat and first takes you on a fascinating trip around the bay and then out to the mangroves. Along with the scenery of the rugged Hajar mountains and mangroves reflecting in the calm, clear water, you’ll also see herons, egrets, flamingos, cormorants and other birds, flying fish and, surprisingly, even camels.

Watch out for the flying fish!

Next stop is the pearl farm itself in the main bay of Rams. A very informative history of pearling is given by the knowledgeable guide followed by a detailed explanation and demonstration of the whole process of pearl farming. After this, an oyster will be selected to be opened and checked for pearls, both cultured and natural.

The final part of the farm tour is the explanation of how pearls are classed according to lustre, size, shape, etc with a chance to see all the pearls and tools up close.

The priceless prayer beads above are one of only three sets which take several years to complete. The other two were gifted to Sheikh Khalifa and Sultan Qaboos.

Products are also on show if anyone would like to buy anything. (Also available in their store in Dubai.)

Before leaving the farm on the boat back to the harbour, each guest receives a gift. I won’t spoil the surprise!

This is absolutely a tour I recommend! Advance booking is required. Tours are 300 dhs upwards for adults, 200 up for children. Visit Al Suwaidi Pearl Farm for more information.

Wadi Ghalila

The picturesque valley of Wadi Ghalila lies not far from the Oman border and is surrounded by the beautiful rock formations of that area, in particular the beautiful striped mountains with layers of varying colours and shades. Some almost look like paintings rather than a natural work of art. Look out for other formations too.

In the last three photos above, notice the different rock formation in the first two and the huge boulders that have fallen down in the last photo.

Following the recent rain, you can find beautiful fields of purple flowers to walk through or sit and picnic in. Within these fields you’ll also find remnants of old buildings constructed out of rocks fallen (or possibly also brought down) from the mountains. Look out for butterflies.

As you drive around the valley, you’ll come across many old buildings, most of which would have been stores for grain, etc and some animal enclosures. There is the odd house around too. Look carefully on the mountainsides for farms and houses. These are only accessible by climbing, but, of course, are all private property.

Can you spot the stone building on here?

The road to the dam has many tiny hamlets on either side of the road with both new villas and old houses and farm buildings. At the time of writing, the dam itself was dry and there is work ongoing at the site, but just past the bridge over the dam on the right, there is a stairway to a hike on the right. Although the first part has actual steps made by the locals, it soon turns into a path and both parts are scattered with loose rock, so care and decent footwear is advised. It leads to the Jebel Jais road and affords a view of several wadis from the top. More information here.

Further down the valley is the Stairway to Heaven, but you’ll have to walk from the road to the beginning of the hike. It is by no means an easy walk or climb and should only be attempted by experienced mountain climbers with appropriate gear and in a group. There have been multiple deaths, injuries and lucky escapes on the mountains, so don’t take this lightly. I’m guessing the helipad near the dam is partly for the mountain rescue helicopters. There are several trekking companies who guide people on this route.

Lastly, you can find quiet area to pitch a tent, either at the foot of the mountains or up the mountains themselves if you go on a hike.

Have fun but be sure to leave the valley in its original beautiful state and leave no trace of your visit behind!

Rock formations around Taween

If you are mesmerised by rock formations like me, head out to Taween on the Dibba Rd E87. Take the turn off to Taween on the side of the road coming from Dibba.

(If you enter 25.5307729,56.1166536, it will take you roughly to the start of the road.)

You can follow the road round to take you back out onto the E87.

The rocks here are all part of the Dibba Zone and if you’re interested in geology, you can read more here.